Woodpeckers of Baja and more.

Debbie and I travel the world photographing birds.  We have quite a collection of woodpecker pics we would like to share with you.

Acorn Woodpecker

Acorn Woodpecker

Reminiscent of a troupe of wide-eyed clowns, Acorn Woodpeckers live in large groups in western oak woodlands. Their social lives are endlessly fascinating: they store thousands of acorns each year by jamming them into specially made holes in trees. A group member is always on alert to guard the hoard from thieves, while others race through the trees giving parrotlike waka-waka calls. Their breeding behavior is equally complicated, with multiple males and females combining efforts to raise young in a single nest.

 

 

 

Arizona Woodpecker

Arizona Woodpecker

A Mexican species of the pine-oak mountain woodlands, the Arizona Woodpecker barely makes its way into the United States and is found only in parts of Arizona and New Mexico.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black-cheeked Woodpecker

Black-cheeked Woodpecker

The black-cheeked woodpecker (Melanerpes pucherani) is a resident breeding bird from southeastern Mexico south to western Ecuador.

This woodpecker occurs in the higher levels of wet forests, semi-open woodland and old second growth. It nests in an unlined hole 6–30 m (20–98 ft) high in a dead tree. The clutch is two to four glossy white eggs, incubated by both sexes.

The binomial commemorates the French zoologist Jacques Pucheran.

The black-cheeked woodpecker feeds on insects, but will take substantial quantities of fruit and nectar.

This common and conspicuous species gives a rattling krrrrrl call and both sexes drum on territory.

Cuban Green Woodpecker

Cuban Green Woodpecker

The Cuban green woodpecker (Xiphidiopicus percussus) is a species of bird in the Picidae family. It is monotypic within the genus Xiphidiopicus.[2] It is endemic to Cuba.

A distinctive, relatively small woodpecker of the general size and shape of a sapsucker, occasionally appearing crested, with bright olive-green upperparts and yellow underparts. Nape and upper breast are bright red with some black bases to feathers usually visible, with black chin and throat; red crown in males, black crown striped white in females. White face and supercilium, punctuated by black border to cheek. Yellow breast is streaked with black or greenish-black, yellow on flanks barred with black. Crissum is yellow with black barring. Females are significantly smaller than the male, generally shorter-billed. Juveniles are generally duller in plumage, showing more barring and streaking below. It measures 20–25 cm (7.9–9.8 in) in length and weighs 48–97 g (1.7–3.4 oz).[3]

Its natural habitats are dry forests, lowland moist forests, and heavily degraded former forest.

Change in pace here.  Alert!  Have you seen this bird?

Yellow-eyed Junco

Yellow-eyed Junco

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’m looking for it’s relative, the Baird’s Junco.  Looks pretty much the same but lives only in the high mountains of Baja.  I think I found a local guy that will take me way up top where they live and I can’t wait to go.  If you have seen one, please let me know.

Downy Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker

The active little Downy Woodpecker is a familiar sight at backyard feeders and in parks and woodlots, where it joins flocks of chickadees and nuthatches, barely outsizing them. An often acrobatic forager, this black-and-white woodpecker is at home on tiny branches or balancing on slender plant galls, sycamore seed balls, and suet feeders. Downies and their larger lookalike, the Hairy Woodpecker, are one of the first identification challenges that beginning bird watchers master.

 

 

 

 

I’m getting wood-peckered out!  Beautiful warm day.  Think I’ll hit the pool.  ‘Till later, Happy Birding from Chris and Debbie.!

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One Response to Woodpeckers of Baja and more.

  1. LottaTidbits says:

    Sure brings back a lot of fond memories!! Let’s go birding!

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