These Baja Birders go to Cuba.

You may not have heard from us for a little while.  These two almost attached-at-the-hip birders flew over to Cuba to do research on Cuban birds.  We shot photos of about 2 hundred different bird types and at least 18 out of 23 endemics.  Smiles on both of us!  Just look at this female American Kestrel, Cuban style.  Soooobeautiful!

American Kestrel

American Kestrel

And that’s the female.  Here in Baja we’re used to seeing spots and stripes on these birds but even the male in Cuba is bare-chested and instead has a Rufous chest.

American Kestrel

American Kestrel

We traveled for hours by car in some cases to find certain birds.  Like this Bahama Mockingbird we searched for and found on Caya Coco on Cuba’s north coast.   This bird sang and sang for us.

Bahama Mockingbird

Bahama Mockingbird

A Black-throated Blue Warbler was found near  a house we stayed at on the Bay-of-Pigs.

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler

This Blueheaded Quail Dove  was shot on our last day.  A bird with a small population that comes and goes in a very restricted habitat that our guide, Chino, new about.  We waited for hours and hours almost daily for this bird to appear and when we were about to give up for good, Debbie says “just a few minutes more, I can feel them coming this way”.  After a 10 minute longer wait and no birds she says “okay, I guess we can go now” and Chino turns around and THERE they were!!! Right behind us! Cameras up and clicking.   Chino is so excited he could hardly contain himself.

Blueheaded Q

Blueheaded Quail Dove

There are not many people in the world that have a chance to see these birds in person and I feel humbled by the experience.  I’m glad we can share with our readers. Here’s a photo of Chino calling a Zapata Wren.  He is one of the best guides I’ve ever been with and I think Debbie would agree.

Chino

Chino

Because of his expertise and our luck (remember?  I’m always saying Debbie and I are called the lucky couple because we see things others miss) we found this rare bird and it even flew to us to sing it’s joyous song. This is the Zapata Wren, a Cuban Endemic (can only be found in Cuba). We found him at the world famous Zapata Swamp.

Zapata Wren

Zapata Wren

Following is a series of shots I took of a Cuban bare-legged Screech Owl.  We found him peeking out of a hole in a dead tree.  So cute…

Cuban bare-legged Screech Owl.c.1He just stayed in the hole looking at us.  We really would like to get a  better photo of this rare bird but the most he would do was stick his head out a little further.

 

 

 

Cuban bare-legged Screech

Cuban bare-legged Screech

 

I remembered an old trick.  I wet my fingers and rubbed  them on my teeth making a squeaky mouse like sound.

 

 

 

This is what happened…………………..

Cuban bare-legged Screech Owl.c.10Cuban bare-legged Screech Owl.c.13Cuban bare-legged Screech Owl.c.14

Cuban Bare-legged Screech Owl.d.4Where is that rat?

Don’t forget, our book “Birds We See” in Baja California is available on Amazon.com Bookstore where it has a 5 star (out of 5) rating and is also now available as an Ebook for your Kindle.  Till next time,  Happy Birding

 

 

 

Be Sociable, Share!
This entry was posted in ChrisnDebbie's Birds Eye Views. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to These Baja Birders go to Cuba.

  1. hburgin says:

    Great shots. So nice to see them up close. Congrats on a great trip.
    hb

Leave a Reply