More accomplishments by these Baja Birders.

Xantus's Hummingbird

Xantus’s Hummingbird

Not to be “tooting our own horn” or anything like that but the image of the Xantus’s Hummingbird (yes, the bird on the cover of our book “Birds We See in Baja“) was purchased by Dr. David Price-Goodfellow.  This photo is to be included in his upcoming book, Hummingbirds of the World.  He found our picture on-line after searching for Xantus’s images.  Sad to say, someone had bootlegged our copyrighted photo to claim as their own but Dr. Goodfellow, owner of a publishing company, found us.  So, for now on we will be watermarking our original photographs to keep the scoundrels from stealing our works.  This has happened before and I’ve had enough of these doggone thieves.

Now that the smoke has cleared in my little room I’ve decided to post some pictures of little birds.  Some of these birds many people never have the chance to see.  Some hide in the deep, dark seclusion of brushy bushes and trees.  This makes them very challenging to shoot as they are always moving and the light is often poor.  Check out this Golden-crowned  Kinglet.   This was taken in our backyard on the Oregon Coast.

Golden-crowned Kinglet

Golden-crowned Kinglet

For those of us that wander around the Baja deserts and arroyos, this little guy (below) can be glimpsed flicking it’s tail as it moves around in the scrubs. That “tail flicking” scares up the insects the Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher feeds on.

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

This little feller is a Canyon Wren.  If you’ve read our book or downloaded the Kindle version you would know that the male Canyon Wren lays a path of pebbles to lead females to the nest.  No Mexican tile or concrete but still an amazing feat for a bird?

Canyon Wren

Canyon Wren

Below, we have a little Baja visitor.  The Cassin’s Vireo  spends the winters in Baja.  Can’t blame it a bit.  This shot was taken at the lagoons in La Ribera.

Cassin's Vireo

Cassin’s Vireo

Here’s a bird that can be really difficult to shoot.  This Common Yellowthroat was photographed at the San Jose Estuary where many species of birds flourish.

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

The Belding’s Yellowthroat, an endangered Baja endemic, is not so fortunate to be like his cousin, the Common Yellowthroat, that is “common”.  I’ve been screaming to deaf ears for as long as I can remember that loss of habit is killing off these birds.  I was even laughed at by XXXXXXX, a famous birding institute, when I wrote about the potential to lose this bird.  Now it is listed as endangered!  Build it and they will come, and the birds will be gone.

Belding's Yellowthroat

Belding’s Yellowthroat

Now that I’ve gotten myself all upset I’ll switch gears a little.  Just a little.  If you sit above the sea , maybe on a little bluff, you might be lucky enough to see an Eared Grebe.  This is the most abundant type of Grebe in the world.  Click on the link and then click the little arrow on “Typical Voice” to listen to the Eared Grebe.

Eared Grebes

Eared Grebes

I don’t know if anyone else has noticed that each year we have fewer and fewer birds in Baja.  Maybe with the exception of European Starlings, (not pointing any fingers).  I used to see many little Gray Flycatchers in our yard in Baja.  I’m still waiting to see one this winter.  Didn’t see any last year.

Gray Flycatcher

Gray Flycatcher

Many Baja birders have hummingbird feeders.  If you do, you may have seen this little warbler trying to feed on the sugar water.  This is an Orange-crowned Warbler.  A numerous and common Warbler throughout the U.S.

Orange-crowned Warbler

Orange-crowned Warbler

Thats it for today. Enjoy and Happy Birding!

 

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2 Responses to More accomplishments by these Baja Birders.

  1. Oly says:

    Won’t be long, I’m ready!

  2. LottaTidbits says:

    Great post Oly….makes me want to grab the ol’ 100-400 and get going!

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